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Yesterday, the second Adam Bien event in Lehmanns Bookstore took place. Again, the event was a full success. I arrived half-an-hour earlier and got a seat only in the tenth row.
Adam spoke about new features of EJB 3.1 and Glassfish. He showed examples running on a developer build of Glassfish V3, promising that the features will work without exceptions…
Here are some topics, I remember:

  • Singleton Beans: usefull a s a central point of the application, e.G. central cache etc…
  • Async Methods: allows asynchronous execution of time-consuming methods. Especially, it is possible to abort the execution
  • Deploying Beans in WARs: could be helpful for small applications
  • Global JNDI-Namespace
  • No interface view: simplifies the access to beans, if needed
  • EJBCOntainer.getEJBContainer().getContext(): allows external initialization of bean context, which is nice for testing

Later, Adam discussed some Core J2EE patters, that become absolete with EJB 3.1 and others which are still valid.

After the talk, I spoke with Adam about the OSGi as a module architecture inside JEE application, which seems interesting to me.

The pictures are as usual available in my FlickR Gallery.

Marco published a video on Loroma.

JUGHHThe holiday season is over and we can enjoy an event every week. After Maven 2, Eclipse Stammtisch and reasoning on modularity an event on enterprise systems can be visited. It seems that after the last visit on Java EE 5 Hacking Adam want to tell something on Java EE 6 Hacking…

This session will be interactive / openspace like. He will walk through the new EJB 3.1 APIs and explain some interesting stuff as well. It is the logical conduction of the first JUG HH session in May 2008.

Location: Lehmanns Fachbuchhandlung (Hamburg Hauptbahnhof), Kurze Mühren 6, 20095 Hamburg

Date and Time: 16.09.2008, 20:00
Topic: Productive Java EE 6 – Rethinking Best Practices And Bashing On Patterns, Cluster One

Abstract: Java EE 6 is great, but many questions like:

  • Are DAOs dead?
  • Do JSF really suck?
  • Are anemic JPA-entities a best practice?
  • Are XML deployment descriptors legacy?
  • Are EJBs lightweight?
  • How to test EJBs?
  • Is layering an antipattern?
  • Do we need factories?
  • How to integrate with RESTFul services?
  • Is it possible to deploy EJBs into a …WAR?
  • Are “plain old web containers” dead?
  • Services or Objects – what is the way to go?

still remain open. These and many other questions will be discussed interactively with …code.

Speaker: Adam Bien

About the speaker: Java Champion Adam Bien is a self-employed consultant, lecturer, software architect, developer, and author in the enterprise Java sector in Germany who implements Java technology on a large scale. He is also the author of several books and articles on Java and J2EE technology, as well as distributed Java programming. His books include J2EE Patterns, J2EE HotSpots, Java EE 5 Architectures, Enterprise Architectures, Enterprise Java Frameworks, SOA Expert Knowledge, and Struts, all published in German.

As BEA technical director, Bien is also a member of the NetBeans Dream Team; an Expert Group member of the Java Community Process for EJB 3.1, JPA 2.0, and Java EE 6; and involved in embedded Java, Grid, and P2P technology. He currently works as an architect and developer in several J2EE-Java EE Model-Driven Architecture (MDA) and EAI component architecture projects for the Java EE platform and .NET.

The Java User Group Hamburg (JUG-HH) organizes another event at Lehmanns Bookstore in Hamburg. This time the subject of the talk is build management and project automation with help of an open-source tool called Maven. Maven is a software project management and comprehension tool. Based on the concept of a project object model (POM), Maven can manage a project’s build, reporting and documentation from a central piece of information.

Subject: Maven 2
Date: Wednesday, 27-th August 2008
Time: 20:00
Who: Christian Matzat

Yesterday, as reported earlier a great session on Java EE 5 featured by Adam Bien took place in Lehmanns Buchhandlung in Hamburg. It was a full success, having approx. 100 developers taking part. Adam asked for the experiences with Java EE and it seemed to be a bunch of professionals. The session slides contained only headings, the rest of the story has been done in NetBeans 6.1 and Glassfish. The entire session has been executed on pretty high speed – to be honest, Adam spoke that quick I just could understand. The session took place in the bookstore, that basically sells two types of books: computer and medical. Adam noticed that the shelf to the right of him contained books on psychiatry, and pointed each time he wanted to express that the antipattern leads to…

The Speaker

Regarding the content, Adam focused on two main directions: the basic enterprise patterns and enterprise anti-patterns (this could be a good book title, btw.). General ideas, like support of DRY principle, convention over configuration and IoC, that are on my opinion the greatest achievements of Java EE 5 has been explained in a very plastic way. Especially, Adam really showed, that the bad-artifacts that made J2EE development boring disappeared in Java EE (or may be better to say: can be avoided). The last part of the talk was attended to the nonfunctional activities around the developed software. Adam focused on testing, management, monitoring, performance, etc… It was pretty interesting to see that Java EE community listens to the developer voices and push the technology towards modern, pragmatic and efficient programming platform.

During and after the session one could ask questions around the topics. Adam told a lot during the answers and proved again his excellent expertise in the Java in general and Java EE in particular. I really enjoyed the session and hope that the next one will not let us wait for several years again. Adam spoke about possible JavaFX session – this would be also very interesting.

( more photos in my photostream)

May 19th, 2008 seems to become an important day for the computer science in Hamburg.

Modelling BPEL Using Abstract State Machines

May 19th, 15:30 – 16:30
Ditze Hörsaal, Schwarzenbergstr. 95, 016 (AudiMax I building), 21073 Hamburg
by Prof. Egon Börger from the University of Pisa, Italy. ( original announcement)

It starts with an invited talk of a Prof. Dr. Egon Börger, famous computer science researcher, applying the concepts of Abstract State Mashines to the software and hardware design at Hamburg University of Technology.

Pragmatic Java EE 5 Hacking – Rethinking Best Practices

May 19th, 20:00 – 22:00
Lehmanns Fachbuchhandlung (am Hauptbahnhof)
Kurze Mühren 6, 20095 Hamburg
by Adam Bien ( original announcement)

On the same day the meeting of the Java User Group Hamburg takes place at Lehmanns Fachbuchhandlung. This time an invited talk on “Progmatic Java EE 5 Hacking” by Adam Bien. Java Champion Adam Bien is a self-employed consultant, lecturer, software architect, developer, and author in the enterprise Java sector in Germany who implements Java technology on a large scale. He is also the author of several books and articles on Java and J2EE technology, as well as distributed Java programming. His books include J2EE Patterns, J2EE HotSpots, Java EE 5 Architectures, Enterprise Architectures, Enterprise Java Frameworks, SOA Expert Knowledge, and Struts, all published in German.

Java EE 5 is a revolution, not an evolution. Perhaps it goes not far enough – however some best-practices and patterns need to be pimped up, re-thought or pruned. After a short introduction into Java EE 5 / Java EE 6 (with a from scratch creation of a simple application with all “enterprise features”). The talk will provide the concept, patterns, best practices and discuss the context, advantages as well as shortcomings and provide suggestions / solutions for Java EE 5/6. This session will be interactive / openspace like. I’m really open for constructive criticism and will try to answer all questions with …code and real world context. Some upcoming Java EE 6 features will be presented as well.

So, see you there…